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First Aid for High Blood Pressure Attacks!

July 16, 2012

First Aid for High Blood Pressure Attacks:

High blood pressure attacks are often misinterpreted as a non-serious scenario especially if the person rescuing you during the attack has no knowledge on the signs and symptoms of it. Some individuals do not feel any symptoms at all even though there blood pressure is very high, or even critically high already. Some may experience dizziness, dull headaches and frequent nose bleeds.

We all know that the risk of hypertension is higher as you age and is more common in men. Usually women develop hypertension after menopausal stage. As per survey, high blood pressure is very prevalent among African-Americans which associate with intent complications involving heart attack and stroke.

High blood pressure is also known as the silent disease since you can have it for several years without even any symptoms then suddenly it erupted. Just waiting for the right time to betray what you think is your healthy life. That is why regular blood pressure check is one of the basics to prevent it.

First Aid for Hypertension

High blood pressure (Hypertension) springs in families, so it’s genetic. Controlling the other risk factors is in your hands. Management and taking hold of high blood pressure includes modification of your lifestyle and medications as per health provider’s advice.

Warning signs of High Blood Pressure:

  1. Severe headache
  2. Anxiousness
  3. Dizziness
  4. Sweating
  5. Abrupt weakness
  6. Sweating
  7. Body stiffs
  8. Nose bleeds

First Aid:

  • Take a deep breath to relax.
  • Move away from a stressful situation since hypertension is usually triggered by it.
  • If nose bleed is present, put ice cold water on the person’s forehead to stop it.
  • Fruit juices with no salt can be of help to the victim too since its high in potassium which helps bring the pressure to its acceptable level.

Note: After doing the first aid measures, it is advised to seek a health care professional for further assessment and prevention of more complications.

DISCLAIMER: The information contained in this site is for educational purposes only, and should not be used as a substitute for personal care by a licensed physician. Please see your physician for diagnosis and treatment of any concerning symptoms or medical condition.

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