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10 Rules for a Healthier and Longer Life:

10 Rules for a Healthier and Longer Life:

1.     Smoking

Stop smoking.

Avoid second-hand smoke.

Pharmacotherapy with nicotine replacement therapy should be used along with referral to special programs.

2.     Diet

Maintain a complete and balanced diet.

Drink water instead of sodas.

Eat more fish and poultry, and less red meat.

Avoid fast food and choose vegetables.

Eat fresh fruit instead of sweet desserts.

Use spices to bring out the flavour.

3.     Weight control

Check your body mass index (BMI).

If BMI >25kg/m2:

  • follow a weight-reduction diet
  • aim for a 10% reduction first

BMI: Normal—18.5-25 kg/m2

               Overweight—25-30 kg/m2

               Obesity—>30 kg/m2

4.     Alcohol

Reduce alcohol intake.

Recommended safe limits of alcohol consumption is up to 2 drinks a day.

A drink = a glass of wine,

250 ml of ordinary strength beer,

a single measure of spirits.

5.     Sleep

Sleep at least 7 hours per night.

6.     Exercise

Do 30-60 min of moderate-intensity exercise per day, minimum of 5 days a week.

  • Light exercise: strolling
  • Moderate exercise: brisk walking, or aerobic activity
  • Vigorous exercise: running

7.     Psychological factors

Learn to cope with stressful emotions.

Use relaxation techniques and other methods of stress control if needed.

8.     Hypertension

Maintain healthy blood pressure.

  • < 140/90 mmHg
  • or < 130/80 in diabetes mellitus or in renal disease

9.     Diabetes

Maintain good glycemic control.

Follow your doctor’s advices.

10.    Other disorders

Schedule regular medical check-ups.

Follow your doctor’s recommendations.

 

DISCLAIMER: The information contained in this site is for educational purposes only, and should not be used as a substitute for personal care by a licensed physician. Please see your physician for diagnosis and treatment of any concerning symptoms or medical condition.

 

Amalgamation of High Blood Pressure and Diabetes

Amalgamation of High Blood Pressure and Diabetes

Many are wondering on what’s the relationship between hypertension and diabetes. Why these two most of the time come together. These two diseases several times occur in the same patients. Many details still are yet to be uncovered but handfuls of its factors are known that direct to these illness.

Here are some of its factors:

  • Both have Usual Risk Factors  

Diabetes and high blood pressure likely shares many stimulating aspects. Comparable set of fact that puts one at peril for maturing high blood pressure also brings to the maturing of diabetes. High-fat diets affluent in salt and processed sugars put accentuate on both enzyme fabrication and the cardiovascular systems. The effectiveness of insulin decreases once your physical activity level is low and it also advances to firm or hard arteries and a failing response from cardiovascular system. Obesity has the same aftermath and is a vigorous contingency factor for both high blood pressure and diabetes.

  • Both Influence Corresponding Patients

Diabetes and high blood pressure is also known as patient-sharing diseases. It means individual diseases likely to influence patients who are formerly at risk for the other. For instance, people who smoke a pack of cigarettes a day or more are likely to consume alcoholic drinks than those who do not smoke at all. Though these vices have nothing in common, smoking and drinking do. It’s the same with persons who take on in lifestyles that makes them prone to diabetes same time tend to follow ways that make them at risk for hypertension.

  • Both are Self-Energizing

Of course patients with diabetes have heightened blood sugar in contrast to patients without. Several consequences with this exuberance sugar includes, slowing but deliberate injury to delicate blood vessels known as capillaries. Injury to certain capillaries destroys the regulating abilities of the kidney’s blood pressure which can lead to higher blood pressure. This elevated blood pressure makes little changes in blood flow, which reveals other delicate capillaries to more injury. Levitated blood pressure can also influence the sensitive insulin secreting areas of the pancreas driving to elevated blood sugar. With this regards, the diabetes/high blood pressure amalgamation is a self-energizing twist in which both diseases tend to worsen over time.

DISCLAIMER: The information contained in this site is for educational purposes only, and should not be used as a substitute for personal care by a licensed physician. Please see your physician for diagnosis and treatment of any concerning symptoms or medical condition.

First Aid for High Blood Pressure Attacks!

First Aid for High Blood Pressure Attacks:

High blood pressure attacks are often misinterpreted as a non-serious scenario especially if the person rescuing you during the attack has no knowledge on the signs and symptoms of it. Some individuals do not feel any symptoms at all even though there blood pressure is very high, or even critically high already. Some may experience dizziness, dull headaches and frequent nose bleeds.

We all know that the risk of hypertension is higher as you age and is more common in men. Usually women develop hypertension after menopausal stage. As per survey, high blood pressure is very prevalent among African-Americans which associate with intent complications involving heart attack and stroke.

High blood pressure is also known as the silent disease since you can have it for several years without even any symptoms then suddenly it erupted. Just waiting for the right time to betray what you think is your healthy life. That is why regular blood pressure check is one of the basics to prevent it.

First Aid for Hypertension

High blood pressure (Hypertension) springs in families, so it’s genetic. Controlling the other risk factors is in your hands. Management and taking hold of high blood pressure includes modification of your lifestyle and medications as per health provider’s advice.

Warning signs of High Blood Pressure:

  1. Severe headache
  2. Anxiousness
  3. Dizziness
  4. Sweating
  5. Abrupt weakness
  6. Sweating
  7. Body stiffs
  8. Nose bleeds

First Aid:

  • Take a deep breath to relax.
  • Move away from a stressful situation since hypertension is usually triggered by it.
  • If nose bleed is present, put ice cold water on the person’s forehead to stop it.
  • Fruit juices with no salt can be of help to the victim too since its high in potassium which helps bring the pressure to its acceptable level.

Note: After doing the first aid measures, it is advised to seek a health care professional for further assessment and prevention of more complications.

DISCLAIMER: The information contained in this site is for educational purposes only, and should not be used as a substitute for personal care by a licensed physician. Please see your physician for diagnosis and treatment of any concerning symptoms or medical condition.

Maintaining Normal Blood Pressure

Maintaining Normal Blood Pressure:

Maintaining a normal blood pressure is one of the key in preventing high blood pressure. How to maintain it? Through regular blood pressure check in your family physician or even in your home if you have the BP apparatus. Individuals above 55 years old are prone to develop high blood pressure. Man over 45 years of age, and 55 for women.

High blood pressure is quite tricky to some individuals. Some has high blood pressure without getting any symptoms at all—so it’s really important to determine the baseline of your blood pressure and have it checked on a regular basis so you can monitor the changes of it if there’s any. Hypertension can lead to heart attack and stroke if not treated earlier.

What is Blood Pressure?

Blood pressure (BP) is the pressure exerted by circulating blood upon the walls of blood vessels, and is one of the principal vital signs. When used without further specification, “blood pressure” usually refers to the arterial pressure of the systemic circulation. (Wikipedia) The force is a bit higher when your heart beats more into your blood vessels and this is called systolic pressure. Diastolic pressure is when the pressure drops between beats.

Pressure builds up when your arteries becomes either narrow or stiff. It’s like pinching the tip of a filled tube—it makes the heart work harder and pressure is already present. Your heart is compose of a muscle with about a size of your fist but works and beats billion times in an average lifetime. That is why you don’t want to add more stress in your heart by having an abnormal blood pressure.  So keeping it in a normal state is very vital.

How to take your Blood Pressure Reading?

Upon arrival in the medical facility, the healthcare provider will ask you to take few minutes to rest before she measures your blood pressure for accurate result. She then will place a cuff and wrap it around your upper arm and start inflating it until the blood stops flowing. Using a stethoscope, for manual BP apparatus, the provider determines the systolic pressure upon hearing the first beat after deflating the cuff, and determines the diastolic pressure when she hears no beat at all. Systolic pressure has to be recorded first.

Normal blood pressure:  A systolic pressure less than 120 and less than 80 diastolic pressure.

Prehypertension: A systolic pressure between 120 and 139 and between 80 and 89 diastolic pressure.

Hypertension (borderline): A systolic over 139 and diastolic over 89.

It’s important to know that one abnormal blood pressure reading does not mean hypertension. Your healthcare provider will check your blood pressure reading several times on different days before deciding if you have high blood pressure.

 

DISCLAIMER: The information contained in this site is for educational purposes only, and should not be used as a substitute for personal care by a licensed physician. Please see your physician for diagnosis and treatment of any concerning symptoms or medical condition.

Risk Factors for High Blood Pressure (Hypertension):

Risk Factors for High Blood Pressure (Hypertension):

For those diagnosed with hypertension already and for those who are not yet, but has hereditary and has unpleasant lifestyle, they must know the numbers of risk factors to be aware on where they stand for prevention and treatment.

Here are the lists of risk factors:

  1. HEREDITARY— you must know your heredo-familial diseases to be aware on what you are risk for. Heredity plays a part in the risk for hypertension. You are more prone to this condition if you have family members with high blood pressure. Between men and women, men are more likely at a younger age to develop hypertension than women, so age is a factor by itself. Over age of 45 in men and over age of 55 in women have a greater risk than the younger ones.
  2. FOOD CHOICES—“what you eat is what you get”, as what the saying says. Handful of chips, bunch of fries, gigantic overload burgers and greasy pizzas are one of the salivating foods but it actually increases the risk for high blood pressure and it affects on your overall health. If you add salt to your food and eats pre-packed or processed foods, it boosts your intake in sodium. One of the major risk factors of hypertension is a diet high in sodium.
  3. BODY WEIGHT—it is important to maintain your body weight at a desired level. Excess weight in your body is a burden on your heart and blood vessels. You are considered overweight if your body mass index (BMI) is 25 or higher. So it means you have a greater risk for hypertension. Try to trim down and aim for a less than 25 BMI to help prevent high blood pressure.
  4. NO EXERCISE—sedentary lifestyle is one of the major risk factors of hypertension. Getting too comfortable in the couch and less activity makes you prone to HPN.  Get at least 30 minutes of moderate or more strenuous exercise almost every day of the week. In doing so, it lowers your risk for hypertension.
  5. BAD HABITS—we all know the dangers of drinking and smoking, and it’s no secret at all. Too much consumption of both are known to contribute to hypertension. So to lower your risk on high blood pressure, try to eradicate these bad habits in your system.
  6. DIABETES—if you’re a diabetic already, you know you’re at risk for these major complications.  The risk of acquiring high blood pressure if you’re a diabetic doubles. People who are diabetic and also high blood pressure are at greater risk of getting heart disease than a person without any of that condition.

Be aware of the risk factors of high blood pressure and take it heartily. We can’t change the fact about your family history, gender, age or race, but that does not mean that you let your health deteriorate by not taking actions.

DISCLAIMER: The information contained in this site is for educational purposes only, and should not be used as a substitute for personal care by a licensed physician. Please see your physician for diagnosis and treatment of any concerning symptoms or medical condition.

High Blood Pressure and Sex Drive

High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) and Sex Drive

Sex is like any other forms of exercise and has somewhat same benefits as to with physical exercise are concerned. It makes your heart pump and demands more work. But people with heart problem are apprehensive if they’re on the safe side. Experts says that it’s rare that one would suffer a heart attack during sexual intercourse and less than 1% of all heart attacks occur during intercourse. People diagnosed with hypertension needs to be careful on the other hand since sex can be dangerous in cases of chronic high blood or if blood pressure is getting high even if the person is under treatment already.

Blood pressure and sex drive has a typical relationship in each. The risk that the hypertensive patients exposed to and the other one are the side effects of the hypertensive medications on sexual function.

Both men and women are affected in there sex drive if they’re diagnosed with high blood pressure. For men, it can cause erectile problems because the blood flow to the penis slows down. For women, their lubrication has significant reduction which likely to experience and causes pain during intercourse, and hypertensive women may have hard time reaching their orgasmic stage.

When you review the side effects of hypertensive medications, you will see the erratic relationship between the two in sexual function. Erectile dysfunction for men depletes the sex drive in some hypertensive medications. Care has to be taken if taking sex performance medicine and must not be combined with nitrates. Combination of both can lead to momentous drop in blood pressure which at times leads to life-threatening.

Here are the lists of some hypertensive medicines commonly used:

  • Clonidine; Methyldopa (antihypertensive)
  • Atenolol; Propanolol (beta-blockers)
  • Enalapril; Lisonopril (ACE-inhibitors)
  • Thiazide diuretics

All these drugs likely causes impotency, loss of ejaculation, impede ejaculation and a decreased sex drive. Some blood pressure medicines hinder with the bearing of testosterone which is necessary for arousal were likely to depreciate sex drive. Consult with your physician for medical advice if encountering sexual dysfunction.

 

 

DISCLAIMER: The information contained in this site is for educational purposes only, and should not be used as a substitute for personal care by a licensed physician. Please see your physician for diagnosis and treatment of any concerning symptoms or medical condition.

Exercise and High Blood Pressure

Exercise and High Blood Pressure:

Exercise and High Blood Pressure—we might think how this two are related to each other. But exercise plays an important role not just for those diagnosed with hypertension already but for everybody who wants to stay fit and healthy.  Exercise or regular physical activity keeps your heart more strong. A strong heart pumps more blood than the weak heart with less effort. The force on your arteries decreases if your heart works less to pump, lowering your blood pressure. If you become active, it lowers your systolic blood pressure (top number) by an average of 5-10 mm Hg (millimetres of mercury).

For some, getting into physical activity or exercise is enough to reduce their need for BP medications. But BP monitoring is still indicated even if your blood pressure is in normal ranges already.

For hypertensive individuals, the demand to do exercise has to be consistent to keep your blood at a desirable level. It keeps it from going up as you age, so maintaining your exercise habit keeps it at ease since its benefits only lasts as long as you pursue with your exercise habits.

Exercise or regular exercise rather, helps you maintain a desirable and healthy weight also, which is one way to controlling blood pressure.

Usually, blood pressure goes high as weight increases. Losing few extra pounds helps reduce your blood pressure already.

A regular exercise of at least 30 to 60 minutes a day is a big factor already. It can lower your blood pressure into few millimetres of mercury and it won’t take long to see a difference with your previous blood pressure measurement. Increasing the exercise level can eventually lower your blood pressure if you haven’t been active.

For those with high blood pressure already, regular physical exercise or activity can bring your blood pressure down to safer levels.

NOTE: Before starting or developing a program exercise, seek for doctor’s advice first to make sure that you’re fit to do so. Cardiovascular strength should be check first for you to determine which program you are safe.

 

 

DISCLAIMER: The information contained in this site is for educational purposes only, and should not be used as a substitute for personal care by a licensed physician. Please see your physician for diagnosis and treatment of any concerning symptoms or medical condition.

 

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